Made in California Series: MIT CNC Giant Architectural Glass Casting Tour - BLOG

Made in California Series: MIT CNC Giant Architectural Glass Casting Tour

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Thursday July 23, 2015 – Made possible by SyncFab’s Made in California Factory Tours Initiative – the Giant Architectural Glass Casting Tour organized for the MIT Alumni Club of Northern California was a tremendous success. The tour provided visiting engineers, architects, artists, sculptors, material experts and related industry practitioners with onsite exposure to giant cast glass rendering, kiln annealing and post process coldworking. At any given time the Studio pours up to 3000lbs of molten glass at 2200 degrees into GIANT Glass Cast Architectural Molds at North America’s Largest such Studio at 22,000 Sq.Ft.MIT CNC John Lewis Glass Casting Tour with SyncFabThe Tour was led by the world’s TOP Glass Casting Artist and Designer for Hearst Falls in NYC’s Hearst Tower, the Oklahoma Memorial, Morgan Stanley’s NYC HQ Glass Atrium, Battery Park NYC, Mikimoto Beverly Hills Glass Dividers, San Francisco residential gate installation, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Boston Museum of Fine Art, the Smithsonian and more.Museum of GlassThe Tour began with an introduction from the CEO at the front gate of the Studio. As the crowd listened and learned more about the rare visual spectacle they were about to witness their anticipation quickly began to build.MIT CNC John Lewis Glass Cast Tour with SyncFabOnce all the members of the group had arrived the visit quickly shifted from 1st gear to overdrive as everyone was escorted to the giant glass molten pour chamber warehouse but not before being greeted at the front by the company mascot!John Lewis Glass MascotAfter a few pets of the friendly greeter the group quickly reassembled inside the casting chamber.MIT CNC John Lewis Giant Glass Cast Tour with SyncFabAs the Glass Casting Team prepared for the molten glass pourMIT CNC John Lewis Glass VisitHearts raced with anticipation as the team moved into place.John Lewis races for the pourAnd then the pour began by priming the furnace valve opening by jettisoning the cullet: The Glass Cullet after it cools: Glass CulletWhich made way for the continual streaming molten pour directly into the Casting Mold:Once the Mold Pour was complete the HOT Mold was pushed to the annealing kiln so the Glass Casting contained within could be transferred inside the kiln to anneal for 3 days. HOT Glass Cast MoldTransferring the Glass Casting from the Mold to the Annealing Kiln – Look at the GORGEOUS Molten Glass Casting: The group enjoyed two helpings of massive molten glass casting pours and seemed to be able to stay and take in more in spite of the heat. With satiated curiosity the group was then invited back into the storage hallway for another address from the CEO on the nuances of Casting various Glass shpaes and forms: Moving to the Cold Working ChamberThen the group was invited into the Post-Processing Coldworking Chamber for a discusion on Diamond Head machine cutting, grinding and polishing.Coldworks ChamberDiamond Cutting MachinesPost Processing RoomPost Processing Room 2Following the complete molten pour to cast to coldworking orientation the group was then invited to the prized gallery to wrap-up the visit with some unique piece views and several helpings of hearty vocational anecdotes.John Lewis Glass DisplayJohn Lewis addresses MIT CNC with SyncFabJohn Lewis Glass BowlsHere is a brief excerpt of one such anecdotal-like discussion where he responds to the scratch resistant nature of his glass coffee table with a comparison of glass furniture and glass sculpture 🙂 Thank You everyone for your participation and support of world class California USA Fabricators!

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